Kuhl Klash Pants Review: Softshell, Rugged and Breathable

If you’ve spent any time outside, you’ve probably run across softshell jackets and pants, and even gloves.

Softshell fabrics are water resistant, not waterproof, and block wind but are much more breathable than waterproof fabrics. They are very comfortable to wear in light snow or wet conditions when you’re moving a lot. They’re typically more stretchy than waterproof materials as well.

The Kuhl Klash Pants are the perfect pant for any kind of wet or snowy conditions. It doesn’t matter if it’s soaking wet out or dry and warm, the pants breathe well and shed water. Zippered pockets keep all your stuff safe and extra features like the cuff guard and lace clips put them a step above any regular pants.

The Klash Pant is one of Kuhl’s most technical pants and are made of a blend of nylon, polyester and spandex. The spandex makes them fairly stretchy. You can easily climb over logs and bend your legs as much as you need to. The gusseted crotch and oversized cut in the thigh area makes them easy to move in and accommodate athletic-sized legs. They are not a skinny or lean cut so they’re great for moving a lot in. I’ve got bigger legs from sprinting and Crossfit and they just don’t fit in skinny pants. The Klash fit great.

They’re coated with a DWR to make them water resistant so the water beads off instead of soaking in. In moderate rain or snow, the water is going to soak in eventually. The fabric itself doesn’t have a waterproof membrane in it but if it’s just a bit of moisture here and there from snow and plants, it sheds it easily.

They aren’t as lightweight as something like the Royal Robbins Traveler Stretch or the Prana Alameda pants but they will be a lot more rugged and water resistant.

Kuhl Klash pant with zippered pockets.jpg Zippers keep everything safe on the Kuhl Klash pant.jpg

All 6 pockets have zippers on them to keep your stuff inside. I like the security of zippered pockets so you don’t have to worry about your stuff and makes it harder for pickpockets if you’re travelling.

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The bottom inside of the leg is a thicker, more durable material that will guard against cuts and scrapes if you’re wearing snowshoes or crampons. On the front is boot clip that can clip to laces and keep your boots pulled down over your boots. They’ll act more like gaiters and stay down around your boots if you go deep into the mud or the snow. The clip can be pushed back into a little pocket if you’re walking around the house or don’t need it. It’s annoying when it’s clipped to your laces (or your toe!) and you don’t want it to be.

The cuffs are plenty big for hiking boots but won’t fit ski boots or snowboard boots, which makes them better for hiking. Though, if the cuff fit, I’d certainly take them touring in light snow, in a second. Their breathability and flexibility would make for great touring pants.

Conclusion

The Kuhl Klash pants make an excellent adventure pant for any kind of conditions. It doesn’t matter if it’s soaking wet out or dry and warm, the pants breathe well and shed water. The zippered pockets keep all your stuff in and extra features like the cuff guard and clip put them a step above any regular pants.

With the forests in the Pacific Northwest being wet most of the year, softshell pants are my go to hiking and snowshoeing pants for 9 or 10 months of the year. Now I’m wearing them to work around the house and just relaxing as well too. I’m not sure if it’s being lazy or efficient but if I really like any clothes I have, I wear them most days for everything I do. The Kuhl Klash pants are in the favourites rotation for sure.

More photos

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Note: This post was originally published March 18, 2021 and has been updated since.

Disclaimer: Kuhl provided these pants free to review.

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