Altra Lone Peak All-WTHR Low Trail Runner Review

Altra have had quite the history with their Lone Peak trail running shoe line. Most of that history has actually been around hiking and thru-hiking.

The Lone Peak series of trail runners has become the a go-to shoe for long distance hikers. Even though they’re fantastic for hiking as a lighter shoe with a wider toebox, they’re actually a trail runner. But whatever you do use them for, you’ll likely find they’re well suited for it.

Most of the Lone Peak line are not waterproof, they let water in and let water out just as fast. When the weather is warm this might be fun. But when it’s cold and miserable it’s nice to have drier feet.

The Lone Peak All-WTHR Low trail runner is basically a Lone Peak 5 but with a burlier mid-sole and a waterproof membrane wrapped around it.

Specs

  • $160 USD
  • eVent waterproof membrane
  • MaxTrac outsole
  • GaiterTrap
  • FootShape toebox
  • 25mm stack height
  • Zero drop
  • Balanced Cushioning
  • Ego midsole
  • 374 grams (13.2 oz)

MaxTrac outsole

The outsole or grippy lugs on a shoe is important. The MaxTrac outsole on the Lone Peak 5 has solid grip without being unstable. The lugs grip but won’t hold on to mud if it’s wet.

The new Ego midsole in the Lone Peak 5 and the ALL-WTHR provides a bit of bounce and cushion. It’s just enough to run on the road if that’s your thing but it feels great on the trail.

I typically run a bit on the road to get to the trails and it’s plenty for that. I wouldn’t do long road runs with them.

There is a rock plate in the forefoot which is nice on the gravel and rocky trails. It adds a bit to the weight but helps keep your feet from getting beat up on the trail.

Zero Drop

Most shoes have some drop in the height from the heel to the toe. High heels are obviously a ridiculously large drop but most running shoes have drop of 10mm from the back to the front. So if a shoe was 35mm from concrete to foot in the back it might have 25mm in the front and a 10mm drop from the back to the front.

Altra have made the ALL-WTHR and Lone Peak 5 zero drop. They take a bit to get used to but they are excellent for mobility and leg strength. When you are walking barefoot, that’s obviously a zero drop how nature intended. Schedule time to work into a zero drop shoe if you have never run or walked in one before.

These ALL-WTHR are 25mm from front to back.

How wide is the toe box?

The FootShape toebox is one of Altra’s signature specs. The extra wide toe box allows your toes to spread out in the shoe just like they would if you were walking barefoot. They say this allows your big toe to line up correctly with the rest of your foot give you more power on each pushoff.

I just love the wide toebox for comfort. It doesn’t feel sloppy but enough for my toes to spread out where they want to. After longer runs or hikes, your feet are going to swell and there’s extra room for that.

The rest of the shoe in the forefoot and heel are narrower to prevent any slipping around. It just leaves space for the toes to do what they need to do.

I haven’t tested the Lone Peak 5 but other testers online mentioned the ALL-WTHR being slightly narrower and slightly shorter than the LP5. If you need every millimetre of that space, the ALL-WTHR’s slight size down might not work.

What is the waterproof membrane?

The waterproof membrane in the Lone Peak ALL-WTHR shoes is the eVent membrane. It’s very similar to the Gore-Tex membrane but is more breathable, allowing sweat to pass through easier from the inside.

The eVent membrane bootie inside the shoe is completely waterproof. You can stand in puddles if you like. The only downside to a waterproof running shoe like this is the low sides. The waterproofing only goes to the top of the shoe!

Running or hiking through snowy, wet or dewy trails is a dream with waterproof shoes like this. Your feet stay dry and warm the whole time. If any water does get in though, it takes a bit longer to get out. If you plan on running through massive puddles or streams over the tops of the shoes, mesh shoes that will drain faster would probably work better.

All waterproof membranes make the shoe a bit warmer. It’s another layer in the shoe that reduces airflow so using a shoe like the ALL-WTHR on hot summer hikes will be hot on your feet. They feel great when it’s cold, snowing and wet outside, when you want the extra warmth to keep those toes moving.

What I like

There’s so much to like about the Lone Peak ALL-WTHR low running shoes. They can run, they can hike, they can go straight through the miserable weather in the winter.

Waterproof eVent Membrane – keeps your feet warm and dry through the slush and puddles.

FootShape toebox – lets your toes spread out and expand on longer hikes and runs.

Zero drop – reinforces more natural movement while running and hiking.

What I don’t like

Heavy – Because of the waterproof membrane, the ALL-WTHR are a bit heavier than the lightweight Lone Peak 5. On slushy days, I’ll take the extra weight if that means I can be more comfortable.

Warm in hot weather – Not the best shoe for hot days running. Something vented like the regular Lone Peaks are better. Most days running in the Pacific Northwest I’m happy to have the waterproofing.

Is there a mid version?

If you’re looking for a lightweight hiker and just looking for higher waterproofing, there’s a mid version of the Lone Peak ALL-WTHR. Same basic shape and features but just taller sides with a bit more support and waterproofing. I haven’t tested these but they look like they’d be excellent light hikers for wet conditions.

Who is this good for?

If you ever hike or run in wet, muddy or snowy conditions, definitely have a look at the Altra Lone Peak ALL-WTHR shoes. They have a ton of space for your toes and keep them dry in gross conditions. They’re going to be very warm when it’s hot out but when the weather turns, it’s definitely nice on the trail.

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