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How to set up a hammock: Rallt Double Camping Hammock Review

    How to set up a hammock: Rallt Double Camping Hammock Review

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    Hammocks are dangerous if you sit in them wrong. But face the right direction and you can sleep in them all night.

    I set up the Rallt double hammock recently to start my testing. First time setting up a gathered-end style hammock. I’ve hooked up spreader-bar hammocks before. Easy. Hook the ring onto the hook. Done.

    For a gathered-end hammock it’s not much more. Put the straps around the tree, hook the carabiner on. Done. Sit crosswise and check out the view. Done. Lean back and fall out the other side. Almost.

    Apparently sitting in a hammock is harder than it looks.

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    About Rallt

    Rallt is a relatively new outdoor company specializing in lightweight adventure products, currently only hammocks. They say everything should be packable and have a purpose. Good rules for every adventure.

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    About the Rallt Double Camping Hammock

    Rallt currently has a Double Camping Hammock and a Single. Almost identical, they differ only in size. The single is 3m x 1.4m (10’ x 4’7”) long and 450 grams (15.9 oz). The double is a little bigger at 3m x 1.9m (10’ x 6’2”) weighing 546 grams (18.9 oz) without rope or hanging straps.

    The hammocks themselves are 70D ripstop nylon gathered at the ends with non-stretch braided polypropylene rope with an aluminum wire-gate carabiner for hanging.

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    The Single is rated for 181 kg (400 lbs) while the double is rated up to 226 kg (500 lbs). The carabiners are rated for 1019 kg (2248 lbs) and the optional straps are rated for 226 kg (500 lbs), though they test them up to 544 kg (1200 lbs).

    Right in the bag with the Single or Double hammocks are 2 lengths of 10 feet of the braided polypropylene rope for tying around the trees. You need to tie your own knots on these ones.

    An optional, and recommended, accessory is the hammock straps. They are 10 foot long straps with 18 loops in each with one at the end. Wrap the strap around the tree, slide one end through the loop at the other and then connect the carabiner to one of the loops. No knots needed.

    Each size is available in 8 colours and a digital camo (looks pixelated). The colours are pretty bright and show up well in photos.

    Ok, those are the specs. What’s it like to sit in?

    Using a hammock

    We’ll just get this out of the way first. You will probably fall out of a hammock one day. They do have a warning saying don’t pitch them high off the ground in case you fall out. If you fall out of a hammock pitched high in the trees, it’s going to hurt.

    The very first time I pitched the Rallt Double, the trees were too close together. The result was the hammock hanging steeply into the centre. It still worked well. I hardly had to move the straps on the trees at all. Picking the perfect trees will take some practice.

    Hanging a hammock

    I had to check out Rallt’s website to make sure I was hanging everything right. Their quick guide to hammock camping pointed me in the right direction.

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    From their guide, they suggest an overhand loop on one end of the rope to clip the carabiner too and then a Siberian hitch around the tree.

    I used the ropes a couple times but prefer the straps because they’re so easy. No adjusting or trying to get it the right tightness. Just wrap the strap around the tree and clip the ‘biner where you want it. Couldn’t be easier.

    They straps, though not as wide as they could be will be nicer on the bark of the tree than the rope will, spreading the load over 3/4 webbing instead of the rope.

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    Getting in (and not falling out)

    Grab both sides of the hammock, take a couple steps back and sit down. Careful leaning back that the fabric is actually behind you!

    You can lay across the hammock which will be shorter but easier to get out of. I do this when I’ve got muddy boots on and just want to chill for a bit.

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    Laying lengthwise along the hammock is definitely the most comfortable. Careful closing your eyes laying like this, you might be out for a while.

    If you want to be more flat, hang the hammock with trees a bit farther apart and pull it tighter in between. If you want to be more upright, hang with trees closer together.

    Sleeping

    Overnighting in a hammock is getting more popular these days. It’s still a pretty unique thing to do and it does come with it’s challenges. To stay warm you can add a sleeping pad in the hammock with your sleeping bag. You can also add an overbag around the whole hammock, like a sleeping bag underneath, to keep the heat in.

    Keeping the bugs out

    If you need some bug protection, there are nets that go all the way around any hammock keep the critters out. Some hammocks have nets built onto the top so you don’t have to bring something extra. Having the net all around means you can leave it at home if you don’t want it for a trip.

    Easy to set up

    There isn’t much to setting up a Rallt hammock with the straps. Wrap a strap around 2 trees and clip on the hammock.

    If you’re using the rope, there’s a bit more to do but still only tying a knot around the tree and some adjustment after. You can leave the carabiner end knot tied.

    Strong

    500 pounds is more than enough for 2 people to hang out in the hammock. 2 people is more a sit together or hang out for a bit kind of configuration. I doubt you’ll be sleeping 2 in a hammock all night.

    With that kind of weight, I could fit another 320 pound person in there. And I’m not going to be laying in a hammock with a 320 pound dude any time soon.

    Straps are rated for the same as the hammock so there’s no worry putting too much stress on them.

    Space for 2 people

    The double easily holds 2 people. Have fun getting in and out, it’s a bit tricky but there’s plenty of room. The single will only hold one but is lighter to carry.

    Inexpensive

    Being only $25.99 and $31.99 USD on Amazon.com ($35.99 and $39.99 CAD on Amazon.ca), the Rallt hammocks are a steal. You’ll pay double that price for some of the other hammocks that don’t even include all the gear to hang it.

    Attached stuff sack

    The Double comes with a stuff sack that fits the hammock and the ropes. It’s attached to the side of the hammock so you never lose it.

    I had trouble finding it the first few times. I forgot it was nicely attached to the side of the hammock and went looking around in my bag and everywhere else before realizing, it’s attached.

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    Aluminum wire-gate clips

    The carabiners are rated to 1019 kg (2248 lbs). Plenty for my purposes. All the edges on the ‘biners are smooth and won’t snag the thin hammock fabric. Regular ‘biners would catch. Their glossy black finish go well with the hammock.

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    Optional Straps

    The straps are optional but well worth it. They’re $25.99 CAD ($16.99 USD). With the straps you don’t have to fiddle with any knots and they don’t press into the tree bark as much as the rope does. You can set up the hammock in about 30 seconds with the straps. They come with the little big below or just stuff them in with the hammock.

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    Wrap-up

    The strength and quality of the Rallt hammocks are a great value for the price. You’ll have to spend quite a bit more with other brands to get that kind of quality.

    Now I just need to get the hammock stand for the stand-up paddle boards and I’m set for the summer.

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    I get these items free to review. I use these connections to get more rad gear to test so you guys get more gear reviews. All opinions on the items are my own.

    Disclosure of Material Connection: I received the Double Camping Hammock for free from Rallt as coordinated by Deep Creek PR, an Outdoor Industry Public Relations Company, in consideration for review publication.

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